Small House of Everything

Small House of Everything

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

MUSIC FROM THE PAST: END OF THE LINE

The Traveling Wilburys.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMVjToYOjbM

BAD JOKE WEDNESDAY

"My roommate is super arrogant.  She always refers to her breasts as 'the twins,' which I think is funny, because I've seen the twins, and they're fraternal." -- Jamie lee

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

MUSIC FROM THE PAST: SHE CAME IN THROUGH THE BATHROOM WINDOW

Joe Cocker, with a great Beatles cover.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsA7lpzffEE

OVERLOOKED FILM: NOSFERATU (1922)

Halloween is two weeks away, so it's a good time to look at this classic take on Dracula.  For me, Max Schreck is the greatest vampire in cinematic history -- his portrayal sparked rumors that he was a real vampire, something that formed the basis of  2000's Shadow of the Vampire with Willem Defoe.  In reality, Schreck (the word means "terror" in German) was a successful stage actor in Germany who drifted into silent films and survived the advent of talkies until his death in 1936.  Schreck was well-known for his innovative use of costume and make-up.

A surprising number of people have never seen Nosferatu.  It is one of the best films ever made and is a striking example of German expressionism in silent film.  This print has the added benefit of a great score.

Enjoy.  Or shiver.  Or both.

https://archive.org/details/Nosferatu1922

Monday, October 16, 2017

MUSIC FROM THE PAST: JUG BAND MUSIC

The Lovin' Spoonful.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijSlzKr30b4

INCOMING


  • Stuart Kaminsky, Behind the Mystery.  Seventeen interviews with well-known American mystery writers:  Sue Grafton, Elmore Leonard, Donald Westlake, Faye and Jonathan Kellerman, Martin Cruz Smith, Robert B. Parker, Lisa Scottoline, James Lee Burke, Tony Hillerman, Ann Rule, Mickey Spillane, Michael Connelly, Evan Hunter/Ed McBain, Sara Paretsky, Joseph Wambaugh, Lawrence Block, and John Jakes.  A great line-up of authors (half a dozen of whom are no longer with us), interesting interviews, wonderful (and multiple) photographs of each subject (along with pics of homes, work spaces, pets, etc.) by Laurie Roberts, all in all a very attractive book (marred by at least one glaring inaccuracy/typo I spotted while thumbing through the book).  A keeper.
  • Robert B. Parker, Rough Weather.  A Spenser novel.  "Heidi Bradshaw is wealthy, beautiful, and well connecte -- and she needs Spenser's help.  in a most unlikely request, Heidi, a notorious gold digger recently separated from her husband, recruits the Boston P.I. to accompany her to he private island, Tashtego, for her daughter's wedding.  Spenser is unsure of what his role as personal bodyguard will entail, but he consents when it's decided that he can bring his beloved Susan Silverman along.  It should be a straightforward job for Spenser:  show up for appearances, have some drinks, and spend some quality time with Susan.  Yet when his old nemesis Rugar -- the Gray Man -- arrives on Tashtego, Spenser realizes that something is amiss.  with a hurricane-level storm brewing outside, the Gray Man jumps into action, firing fatal shots into the crowd of guests and kidnapping the bride -- but Spenser knows that the sloppy guns-for-hire abduction is not Rugar's style."  I've been catching up on Parker and Spenser recently.  Despite the fact that Susan is annoying and Spenser is a bit too-too, I've been enjoying the read-a-thon.  I'll probably wrap up the entire series over the next week.

Sunday, October 15, 2017

HOP O' MY THUMB

Two different edition of Charles Perrault's classic children's story with interesting illustrations.  No dates of publication are given but it's safe to assume it was before my time.  The second appears to be from the 1880s.  The first is filed under "filicide."  Fairy tales were much tougher back then.


https://archive.org/details/hopomythumbperra00perriala

https://archive.org/details/hopomythumb00perriala